The great thing about an open-source phone, like openmoko, is that when there’s a problem, all the community can gather to find a solution.

At the beginning of the week, some people complained that they couldn’t get their phone GPS working: Time To First Fix signal (the initial signal that tell the phone where in the world it is) was taking infinite time when a SD card was inserted.

Then some people joined the thread on the community mailing list to confirm the problem (other people joined just to complain, not helping much), and after a bunch of test, the source of the problem was confined on the SD card reader.

Software solution

After 24h, the OpenMoko team released a software solution to the problem, stopping the SD card reader internal clock just the time to get the TTFF signal, about 40 seconds, then everything would be back to normal.

The patch has been directly available on the project git repository, allowing the mos furious to recompile and reflash their phone in hours, the others waited for the daily build. Imagine that, you get everyday a new build for your phone, without waiting for the infamous version 2.0 vaporware that might come out one day.

People have tested it, it works for many, but there’s still some phones that don’t have it.

Hardware solution

This morning, the OpenMoko hardware team published their hardware solution:

“Soldering a 10pF capacitor between PIN5 and PIN6 at SD card slot without taking off the case as the below picture showed.”

That might be a bit difficult for anyone to get access to a pico-capacitor and solder it at this tiny place, but at least it’s accessible for most of the soldering geeks.

So at the end, you’ve got a phone that’s so open that you’ve got a software and hardware solution of a production problem in a week. Of course, it’s not a consumer-ready phone, it would have been a complete disaster to recall all the phones, that’s just a bunch of geeks today that can touch this phone, but someday, you’ll have it in your hand, and you’ll just have to imagine all the open-source work that float inside.

Last week, Mininova has released a bookmark system for its users, it would allow remote downloading, but information are missing to configure Azureus/Vuze properly, here is a mini tutorial.

You can imagine the reation of channels on Mininova, give your feed to your friends, and all start to download the same torrents at the same time to improve your speed and share the good content!

Mininova configuration

  1. Create a mininova account, or use your own to login
  2. When logged in, bookmark icon will appear next to the torrent link. Example: Auberge Espagnole
  3. Click on the bookmark link, it will be add on your bookmarks page

Azureus configuration

Be sure to have the last version of Azureus

Installing RSSFeed Scanner plugin

Open Azureus, and go in menu: File -> Plugins -> Installation Wizard…
Select “By list from Sourceforge.net“, and select the plugin RSS Feed Scanner in the list, click Next and Install

Configuring RSSFeed Scanner plugin

Go in menu: File -> Plugins -> RSSFeed Scanner, select “Options” tab

Adding a RSS Feed URL

Click on the “+” next to the top box

  • Give it a name
  • Set the URL you’ll find on your bookmarks page on mininova (called Your personal RSS feed)
  • press “Enabled
  • and save

Adding a Filter

Click on the “+” next to the bottom box

  • Give it a name
  • Set the filter to “^http
  • Select “Filter is a Regular Expression
  • Deselect “Filter searches title
  • Set state to “Forced Download” if you wanted your torrent to start automaticly
  • Set Feed to your mininova feed your mininova feed you’ve just added to Azureus
  • Set type to “None
  • Press “Enabled
  • and save

Go inside tab “Status”, and you’ll see your bookmarks there, starting to download.

[OpenMoko] Projects round-up

Thanks to Pablo Ruiz Múzquiz, there is actually an OpenMoko GroupSale occuring in Madrid, and 10 people will soon receive an OpenMoko FreeRunner for the joy of hacking it!

I’ve spend some time on the OpenMoko wiki, and here is a list of the wonderful stuff I’ve discovered:

More to see when the phone arrive in hands.

After few months of wordpress-mu customization for BBVAblogs, we’re currently opening the code so you all can play with it.

Here are the links to follow the dev of this platform:

Project page: manual, feature requests and bugs

Source code: version control with git, clone it, fork it, enjoy it!

It includes wordpress-mu with various plugins, and some homemade templates to manage a blog community, feel free to leave your comments and feature requests and the project page.

Final version should be ready for the Campus Party at Valencia on the 28th of July.

Milestone achieve by Adrian and Vik of the RepRap community, they’ve replicated entirely a Darwin machine, and this child is beginning to print itself another printer!

Adrian (left) and Vik (right) with a parent RepRap machine, made on a conventional rapid prototyper, and the first complete working child RepRap machine, made by the RepRap on the left. The child machine made its first successful grandchild part at 14:00 hours UTC on 29 May 2008 at Bath University in the UK, a few minutes after it was assembled.

With dozens of ssh connections each days, you better need a shortcut way to make it faster. Frustation comes to a end with this script:

Put this ruby script in your bin directory, make it executable, add your servers info hash in the array, and eventually copy your ssh public key in the various servers to never be asked for password.

When executing it, you can give it the ‘id‘ as an argument, and it will connect automatically to the server with the corresponding id!

Pressmark with a WordPress installation with all you need to start a social bookmarking website (like del.icio.us, sabros.us, …).


You can see a demo of Pressmark installation on bookmark.alexgirard.com

Pressmark includes WordPress Prologue theme, which has been used by WordPress team to have a twitter-like dev-blog.
Prologue include Gravatar support, so go to upload your avatar on gravatar.com to have a nicer output!

If you feel like adding your own modification to the code, you can clone/fork the project on Github: http://github.com/alx/pressmark/. All contributions will be welcomed!

Ideas to extend Pressmark:

  • Bookmarlet, Jabber bot for easy posting;
  • Import from bigger social-bookmark accounts (delicious, magnolia, …)
  • Cross-blogging to decentralized bookmark management in various blog spaces

Installation

  • Get Pressmark sources:
    • Download it from Github
    • If you’ve got git installed, clone it from Github (to easily get last updated)

      git clone git://github.com/alx/pressmark.git pressmark
  • Move the source to your webserver, ask a geek how to do it if you don’t know :)
  • WordPress configuration: copy ‘wp-config-sample.php‘ to ‘wp-config.php‘ and fill up the MySQL database information.
  • Access to the website where you’ve installed Pressmark, and begin the “2 min. installation” from WordPress
  • Now that your website is ready, go in the administration pages and activate the following options:
    • In ‘Design‘: select ‘Prologue‘ theme;
    • In ‘Setting‘: select ‘Anyone can register‘ and set the ‘New User Default Role‘ to ‘Author‘ if you want your users to post links;
    • In ‘Plugins‘: activate ‘WP-OpenID‘ plugin

After a week of “502 Bad Gateway” error on blog.feevy.com, it was time to dive in our new Nginx toy on Feevy server and understand what happened.

First, Nginx is not like Apache or Lighttpd, it doesn’t support FastCGI by default. So, you need to be sure you’ve compiled the fcgi module with your PHP installation.

On Centos, to compile a new PHP, just launch: /scripts/easyapache

Then you’ll need to launch the FastCGI process, download this FastCGI script, place it in /usr/local/bin, and add it to your init.d.

At the end, you just need to configure your php server in nginx, that would be the most simple part:

  server {
      listen 80;
      server_name     blog.feevy.com;
      index           index.php;
      root            /home/wwwfeev/blog;

      if (!-e $request_filename) {
        rewrite  ^(.*)$  /index.php?q=$1  last;
        break;
      }

      location ~ .php$ {
         fastcgi_pass  127.0.0.1:9999;
         fastcgi_index index.php;
         fastcgi_param SCRIPT_NAME $fastcgi_script_name;
         fastcgi_param REQUEST_URI $request_uri;
         fastcgi_param DOCUMENT_URI $document_uri;
         fastcgi_param DOCUMENT_ROOT $document_root;
         fastcgi_param REMOTE_ADDR $remote_addr;
         fastcgi_param REMOTE_PORT $remote_port;
         fastcgi_param SERVER_ADDR $server_addr;
         fastcgi_param SERVER_PORT $server_port;
         fastcgi_param SERVER_NAME $server_name;
         fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME  /home/wwwfeev/blog/$fastcgi_script_name;
         fastcgi_param QUERY_STRING $query_string;
         fastcgi_param REQUEST_METHOD $request_method;
         fastcgi_param CONTENT_TYPE $content_type;
         fastcgi_param CONTENT_LENGTH $content_length;
      }
  }

Sorry for all the people who couldn’t watch the Reprap move in 3D last friday in Bilbao, it’s finally working tonight!

The code to control the robot is really elegant, and it was not really hard to find the missing part to make it work properly.
I’ve also add a setMax() method on the axises, so the hardware opto-endstop are not needed anymore. but it’ll be cool to keep them just to use them to set the print-header home. I think I’ve seen some example like this somewhere, but I’m not usre yet how it works.

People interesting in downloading/cloning/forking the Arduino firmware for Reprap can go to the project page on Github.